Restorative winter warmth

WINTER has certainly hit with a vengeance these past couple of weeks, driving us all to light our fires and get the soup pots bubbling.
On top of that, we have the twin lurgies of Covid and influenza hitting our schools and workplaces. So this edition of Fresh is dedicated to all things warm and restorative.
Alison Lambert has dug deep into her repertoire for foods that sooth us when we are sick, with a lemon, honey and ginger syrup and lozenges to help with coughs, and bone broth to boost our immunity.
Even if we are hail and hearty, a good winter soup is a must for lunches or even a substantial meal and Steph Peirce has provided us with the perfect options for both.
Nadia Lim reminds us of the joys of a good winter snowfall and the excuses it gives us to make comforting desserts such as crumble.
She gives some advice on growing tamarillos (aka tree tomatoes) which are chock-full of vitamin C and antioxidants, so great winter food which can be used in both sweet and savoury dishes — check out her tamarillo, apple and chocolate crumble and her tamarillo salsa.
When you come in from the snow or the wet winter sports field there is nothing better than having a hearty winter stew ready to throw in the oven, such as Joan Bishop’s chicken and cannellini bean stew, which will hit the spot.
To my mind, there is also nothing more restorative than curling up on the sofa with a good book and the fire roaring on a winter’s day. And it is even better if that book is an uplifting tale accompanied by some delicious recipes — my idea of bliss.
Breadsong is one of those books. It is the story of father and daughter Al and Kitty Tait and how the family came together when a teenaged Kitty began to experience anxiety. Her discovery of bread-making changed their lives in many ways and they have shared Kitty’s recipes in the book alongside their story. So if you like nothing better than a quiet afternoon making bread or pastries, this is the book for you.
And if you are looking for a quiet tipple to have beside that fire, Mark Henderson suggests looking to some wine varieties that may have gone out of fashion, but are still worthy of seeking out.

Rebecca Fox
Lifestyle editor

We Love Local, a New Zealand sustainable food gift box company, is offering Fresh readers a chance to win one of their new Outstanding Otago gift boxes. The box’s feature goods by Otago artisans, makers, distillers, vintners, and brewers. The boxes come in a variety of sizes and feature products including Kitchen Window, Dog Town Mustard, Taste of the Alps, Wild Fennel Co., Forage & Gold Honey, Ocho Chocolate, Bay Rd Peanut Butter, Benjer Juices and Dunford Grove Olive Oil. To be in to win please send your name, address and contact details to playtime@odt.co.nz by July 7.

We Love Local, a New Zealand sustainable food gift box company, is offering Fresh readers a chance to win one of their new Outstanding Otago gift boxes. The box’s feature goods by Otago artisans, makers, distillers, vintners, and brewers. The boxes come in a variety of sizes and feature products including Kitchen Window, Dog Town Mustard, Taste of the Alps, Wild Fennel Co., Forage & Gold Honey, Ocho Chocolate, Bay Rd Peanut Butter, Benjer Juices and Dunford Grove Olive Oil. To be in to win please send your name, address and contact details to playtime@odt.co.nz by July 7.

Restorative winter warmth

WINTER has certainly hit with a vengeance these past couple of weeks, driving us all to light our fires and get the soup pots bubbling.
On top of that, we have the twin lurgies of Covid and influenza hitting our schools and workplaces. So this edition of Fresh is dedicated to all things warm and restorative.
Alison Lambert has dug deep into her repertoire for foods that sooth us when we are sick, with a lemon, honey and ginger syrup and lozenges to help with coughs, and bone broth to boost our immunity.
Even if we are hail and hearty, a good winter soup is a must for lunches or even a substantial meal and Steph Peirce has provided us with the perfect options for both.
Nadia Lim reminds us of the joys of a good winter snowfall and the excuses it gives us to make comforting desserts such as crumble.
She gives some advice on growing tamarillos (aka tree tomatoes) which are chock-full of vitamin C and antioxidants, so great winter food which can be used in both sweet and savoury dishes — check out her tamarillo, apple and chocolate crumble and her tamarillo salsa.
When you come in from the snow or the wet winter sports field there is nothing better than having a hearty winter stew ready to throw in the oven, such as Joan Bishop’s chicken and cannellini bean stew, which will hit the spot.
To my mind, there is also nothing more restorative than curling up on the sofa with a good book and the fire roaring on a winter’s day. And it is even better if that book is an uplifting tale accompanied by some delicious recipes — my idea of bliss.
Breadsong is one of those books. It is the story of father and daughter Al and Kitty Tait and how the family came together when a teenaged Kitty began to experience anxiety. Her discovery of bread-making changed their lives in many ways and they have shared Kitty’s recipes in the book alongside their story. So if you like nothing better than a quiet afternoon making bread or pastries, this is the book for you.
And if you are looking for a quiet tipple to have beside that fire, Mark Henderson suggests looking to some wine varieties that may have gone out of fashion, but are still worthy of seeking out.

Rebecca Fox
Lifestyle editor

We Love Local, a New Zealand sustainable food gift box company, is offering Fresh readers a chance to win one of their new Outstanding Otago gift boxes. The box’s feature goods by Otago artisans, makers, distillers, vintners, and brewers. The boxes come in a variety of sizes and feature products including Kitchen Window, Dog Town Mustard, Taste of the Alps, Wild Fennel Co., Forage & Gold Honey, Ocho Chocolate, Bay Rd Peanut Butter, Benjer Juices and Dunford Grove Olive Oil. To be in to win please send your name, address and contact details to playtime@odt.co.nz by July 7.

Sweetly does it


SOMETIMES on a cold winter day all you want is a sweet treat. These recipes from Green Kitchen: Quick & Slow by Stockholm bloggers David Frenkiel and Luise Vindahl hit the spot.
Their recipes are even tested in New Zealand by Nicola Moore from her home in Te Arai, on the outskirts of Auckland.

Jam crumble bars

These are a mix between dessert and breakfast, which is perfect because that allows us to make them as a night-time snack and then enjoy a slice again in the morning! Buckwheat groats add a nice extra crunch on top and the spices combine with the fruit and melted butter in perfect harmony. Use store-bought jam if you prefer it sweeter.

  • 8 soft dates, pitted
  • 250g (2½ cups) rolled oats
  • ½ tsp sea salt flakes
  • ½ tsp ground cinnamon
  • ¼ tsp ground cardamom
  • ¼ tsp ground ginger, or 1 tsp grated fresh ginger
  • zest of 1 lemon
  • 150g butter, melted
  • 3 tbsp maple syrup
  • 125ml (½ cup) raspberry chia jam (see below), or store-bought raspberry jam (jelly)
  • 4 tbsp buckwheat groats

Method
Preheat the oven to 180°C and line an 18 x 28 cm baking sheet with baking parchment.
Place the dates, oats, salt, cinnamon, cardamom, ginger and lemon zest in a food processor and pulse until it all comes together into a crumbly mixture.
Brown the butter and maple syrup in a small saucepan over a medium low heat for 5 minutes, stirring continuously. Add this to the mixture in the food processor and pulse again.
Press three quarters of the mixture tightly into the prepared baking sheet. Spread over a generous layer of jam, then add the buckwheat to the remaining crumble mixture and sprinkle this on top.
Bake for 25–30 minutes until golden. Leave to cool in the baking sheet, then carefully lift up the cake in the parchment paper and cut into 20 little bars.
These will keep in an airtight container in the fridge for up to a week. They are also suitable for freezing.

Notes:
Raspberry chia jam: In a saucepan, combine 225 g frozen raspberries with 3 tablespoons of water, 1 tablespoon of maple syrup and 1 tablespoon of chia seeds. Bring to a boil, let simmer for a few minutes, then take off the heat and leave to cool.
Make them vegan: Replace the butter with coconut oil or another neutral oil.

Vegan tahini cookies

These cookies go by the street name ‘Lockdown Cookies’, as they went viral during the first COVID-19 lockdown. These were inspired by a recipe originally created by Edd Kimber, aka The Boy Who Bakes. In this version we use half the sugar, with dates providing the rest of the sweetness, and we’ve also made them naturally gluten-free and provide both a vegan option using aquafaba as well as a nonvegan option.

  • 125g (1 cup) sorghum flour or oat flour
  • 100g (¾ cup) buckwheat flour (or plain/all-purpose flour)
  • 1½ tsp baking powder
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 100g coconut oil (or butter), at room temperature
  • 100ml (scant ½ cup) tahini
  • 100g (½ cup) light brown sugar or coconut sugar
  • 75g soft dates (roughly 8)
  • 100ml (scant ½ cup) aquafaba (chickpea brine) (or 2 large free-range eggs)
  • 150g chocolate (70% cocoa), roughly chopped
  • 4 tbsp sesame seeds, to coat

Method
In a large bowl, mix together the sorghum or oat flour, buckwheat flour, baking powder and salt, then set aside.
Place the coconut oil or butter, tahini, sugar and dates in a food processor and mix for a few minutes on high until light and fluffy. Add the aquafaba and stir together until combined.
Pour the butter mixture into the bowl with the flour mixture, then add the chocolate and mix everything together. Chill the dough for 2 hours until firm (or stick it in the freezer for 20 minutes).
Preheat the oven to 195°C (175°C fan) and line 1–2 baking sheets with baking parchment.
Divide the dough into 16 pieces, each about 45 g. Roll into balls and coat moderately in the sesame seeds.
Place on the prepared baking tray(s) and bake for about 10 minutes. After they’ve been in the oven for about 5–6 minutes, remove the tray(s) from the oven and smack against the tabletop or work surface: this will help the cookies flatten out a bit. Return to the oven for the remaining time until slightly browned.
Leave to cool on the baking tray for a few minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely. These will keep in a sealed container for about 4–5 days (but trust us, they won’t last that long).

Notes:
Not friends with tahini? You can make these with a runny peanut butter instead.

SOMETIMES on a cold winter day all you want is a sweet treat. These recipes from Green Kitchen: Quick & Slow by Stockholm bloggers David Frenkiel and Luise Vindahl hit the spot.
Their recipes are even tested in New Zealand by Nicola Moore from her home in Te Arai, on the outskirts of Auckland.

Jam crumble bars

These are a mix between dessert and breakfast, which is perfect because that allows us to make them as a night-time snack and then enjoy a slice again in the morning! Buckwheat groats add a nice extra crunch on top and the spices combine with the fruit and melted butter in perfect harmony. Use store-bought jam if you prefer it sweeter.

  • 8 soft dates, pitted
  • 250g (2½ cups) rolled oats
  • ½ tsp sea salt flakes
  • ½ tsp ground cinnamon
  • ¼ tsp ground cardamom
  • ¼ tsp ground ginger, or 1 tsp grated fresh ginger
  • zest of 1 lemon
  • 150g butter, melted
  • 3 tbsp maple syrup
  • 125ml (½ cup) raspberry chia jam (see below), or store-bought raspberry jam (jelly)
  • 4 tbsp buckwheat groats

Method
Preheat the oven to 180°C and line an 18 x 28 cm baking sheet with baking parchment.
Place the dates, oats, salt, cinnamon, cardamom, ginger and lemon zest in a food processor and pulse until it all comes together into a crumbly mixture.
Brown the butter and maple syrup in a small saucepan over a medium low heat for 5 minutes, stirring continuously. Add this to the mixture in the food processor and pulse again.
Press three quarters of the mixture tightly into the prepared baking sheet. Spread over a generous layer of jam, then add the buckwheat to the remaining crumble mixture and sprinkle this on top.
Bake for 25–30 minutes until golden. Leave to cool in the baking sheet, then carefully lift up the cake in the parchment paper and cut into 20 little bars.
These will keep in an airtight container in the fridge for up to a week. They are also suitable for freezing.

Notes:
Raspberry chia jam: In a saucepan, combine 225 g frozen raspberries with 3 tablespoons of water, 1 tablespoon of maple syrup and 1 tablespoon of chia seeds. Bring to a boil, let simmer for a few minutes, then take off the heat and leave to cool.
Make them vegan: Replace the butter with coconut oil or another neutral oil.

Vegan tahini cookies

These cookies go by the street name ‘Lockdown Cookies’, as they went viral during the first COVID-19 lockdown. These were inspired by a recipe originally created by Edd Kimber, aka The Boy Who Bakes. In this version we use half the sugar, with dates providing the rest of the sweetness, and we’ve also made them naturally gluten-free and provide both a vegan option using aquafaba as well as a nonvegan option.

  • 125g (1 cup) sorghum flour or oat flour
  • 100g (¾ cup) buckwheat flour (or plain/all-purpose flour)
  • 1½ tsp baking powder
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 100g coconut oil (or butter), at room temperature
  • 100ml (scant ½ cup) tahini
  • 100g (½ cup) light brown sugar or coconut sugar
  • 75g soft dates (roughly 8)
  • 100ml (scant ½ cup) aquafaba (chickpea brine) (or 2 large free-range eggs)
  • 150g chocolate (70% cocoa), roughly chopped
  • 4 tbsp sesame seeds, to coat

Method
In a large bowl, mix together the sorghum or oat flour, buckwheat flour, baking powder and salt, then set aside.
Place the coconut oil or butter, tahini, sugar and dates in a food processor and mix for a few minutes on high until light and fluffy. Add the aquafaba and stir together until combined.
Pour the butter mixture into the bowl with the flour mixture, then add the chocolate and mix everything together. Chill the dough for 2 hours until firm (or stick it in the freezer for 20 minutes).
Preheat the oven to 195°C (175°C fan) and line 1–2 baking sheets with baking parchment.
Divide the dough into 16 pieces, each about 45 g. Roll into balls and coat moderately in the sesame seeds.
Place on the prepared baking tray(s) and bake for about 10 minutes. After they’ve been in the oven for about 5–6 minutes, remove the tray(s) from the oven and smack against the tabletop or work surface: this will help the cookies flatten out a bit. Return to the oven for the remaining time until slightly browned.
Leave to cool on the baking tray for a few minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely. These will keep in a sealed container for about 4–5 days (but trust us, they won’t last that long).

Notes:
Not friends with tahini? You can make these with a runny peanut butter instead.

Spicing up comfort


STEPH PEIRCE

LET’S get things interesting, wholesome, affordable and in season this winter. When that first cold snap comes through, all of a sudden we start to crave a nice hot soup — it feels like a warm hug to nestle into on those cold days. Something I, myself, could eat daily in winter, but not the same ones each day as I still like to have new flavours and textures to keep mealtimes interesting and exciting. Here I have a few of my favourites that are all very different from each other. This way it doesn’t feel like I’m on rinse and repeat. Make a batch and freeze some in portions so you have a few options on hand, and that way you don’t dread the last few portions — there’s nothing worse than eating the same soup for four days in a row because the batch was so big. Enjoy the variety of flavours these soups offer while all being affordable with in-season ingredients.

Caramelised onion, parsnip and pear soup with hazelnut brown butter

PHOTO: STEPH PEIRCE

PHOTO: STEPH PEIRCE

  • 700g parsnip, peeled and cut into 5cm wedges
  • 2 medium pears, peeled, cored and cut into quarters
  • 1 tsp nutmeg
  • 2 onions, roughly chopped
  • 8 long sprigs fresh thyme, plus 1 tbsp thyme leaves
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • 1.2 litres vegetable or chicken stock
  • 120g creme fraiche
  • 50g butter
  • 50g toasted hazelnuts, skins removed
  • 1 large garlic clove, crushed
  • Sea salt and cracked pepper

Method
Preheat oven to 180degC.
Place prepared parsnip and pears on to a large baking tray, drizzle with half of the oil, the nutmeg, 1 tsp salt and a good grind of black pepper, toss with your hands to evenly coat and bake for 45 minutes until starting to colour and soft.
Place a medium pot on to medium heat and add remaining oil, chopped onions, thyme sprigs and 1 tsp salt. When you hear the sizzle of the onions, reduce heat to medium-low, cover and allow to cook for 20 minutes, stirring every 5 minutes to ensure even caramelisation, then add stock to the onions and simmer for 20 minutes.
Add the roasted parsnip and pears, then cook for a further 10 minutes.
Meanwhile, using a small pot on a medium heat, add butter and cook until foamy and dark golden brown (3-4 minutes). Add thyme leaves, garlic and a good pinch of sea salt. Transfer to a food processor with hazelnuts and pulse until hazelnuts are coarsely chopped.
Remove thyme stalks from the soup. Using a stick blender, blend soup until smooth consistency, alternatively puree in a food processor in 2-3 batches before returning to the pot with creme fraiche, mix until fully incorporated. Taste for extra seasoning.
Top soup with warm hazelnut brown butter and serve with toasted sourdough.

Steph Peirce. PHOTO: ROY BYRNE

Steph Peirce. PHOTO: ROY BYRNE

Steph Peirce. PHOTO: ROY BYRNE

Steph Peirce. PHOTO: ROY BYRNE

LET’S get things interesting, wholesome, affordable and in season this winter. When that first cold snap comes through, all of a sudden we start to crave a nice hot soup — it feels like a warm hug to nestle into on those cold days. Something I, myself, could eat daily in winter, but not the same ones each day as I still like to have new flavours and textures to keep mealtimes interesting and exciting. Here I have a few of my favourites that are all very different from each other. This way it doesn’t feel like I’m on rinse and repeat. Make a batch and freeze some in portions so you have a few options on hand, and that way you don’t dread the last few portions — there’s nothing worse than eating the same soup for four days in a row because the batch was so big. Enjoy the variety of flavours these soups offer while all being affordable with in-season ingredients.

PHOTO: STEPH PEIRCE

PHOTO: STEPH PEIRCE

Caramelised onion, parsnip and pear soup with hazelnut brown butter

  • 700g parsnip, peeled and cut into 5cm wedges
  • 2 medium pears, peeled, cored and cut into quarters
  • 1 tsp nutmeg
  • 2 onions, roughly chopped
  • 8 long sprigs fresh thyme, plus 1 tbsp thyme leaves
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • 1.2 litres vegetable or chicken stock
  • 120g creme fraiche
  • 50g butter
  • 50g toasted hazelnuts, skins removed
  • 1 large garlic clove, crushed
  • Sea salt and cracked pepper

Method
Preheat oven to 180degC.
Place prepared parsnip and pears on to a large baking tray, drizzle with half of the oil, the nutmeg, 1 tsp salt and a good grind of black pepper, toss with your hands to evenly coat and bake for 45 minutes until starting to colour and soft.
Place a medium pot on to medium heat and add remaining oil, chopped onions, thyme sprigs and 1 tsp salt. When you hear the sizzle of the onions, reduce heat to medium-low, cover and allow to cook for 20 minutes, stirring every 5 minutes to ensure even caramelisation, then add stock to the onions and simmer for 20 minutes.
Add the roasted parsnip and pears, then cook for a further 10 minutes.
Meanwhile, using a small pot on a medium heat, add butter and cook until foamy and dark golden brown (3-4 minutes). Add thyme leaves, garlic and a good pinch of sea salt. Transfer to a food processor with hazelnuts and pulse until hazelnuts are coarsely chopped.
Remove thyme stalks from the soup. Using a stick blender, blend soup until smooth consistency, alternatively puree in a food processor in 2-3 batches before returning to the pot with creme fraiche, mix until fully incorporated. Taste for extra seasoning.
Top soup with warm hazelnut brown butter and serve with toasted sourdough.

PHOTO: STEPH PEIRCE

PHOTO: STEPH PEIRCE

Harissa, meatball and cannellini bean soup

  • ½ onion
  • ½ leek
  • 1 celery stick
  • 2 small carrots
  • 6 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 4 tbsp Local&Friday harissa paste
  • 1 can chopped tomatoes
  • 1.5 litres chicken or vegetable stock
  • 1 Tbsp maple syrup or brown sugar
  • Juice of half a lemon
  • 1 can cannellini beans, rinsed and drained
  • 60g spinach or silverbeet, roughly chopped
  • Salt and pepper to taste

    Meatballs
  • 300g beef mince
  • ½ onion, grated
  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 1 egg
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • ¼ tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • ¼ cup grated parmesan
  • ½ tsp oregano
  • 1 tsp smoked paprika

Method
Using a heavy-bottomed, ovenproof dish or pot, heat oil over medium heat. Add onion, leek, celery, carrot and 1 tsp salt and cook for 10 min, stirring frequently until vegetables soften slightly. Add garlic and harissa paste, then cook for 2 minutes until aromatic. Add tomatoes and chicken stock, cover and simmer for 25 minutes.
Meanwhile, for the meatballs, combine all ingredients in a medium-sized bowl and mix together with your hands until well combined. Using a teaspoon, spoon out heaped teaspoons of mixture and roll into small balls. Place in the fridge.
Remove the lid from the soup, giving it a good stir, and add the spinach/silverbeet, maple syrup/brown sugar, lemon juice and cannellini beans. Cook for 2 minutes before gently placing the meatballs into the soup, making sure they are slightly covered by the liquid. Cover the pot and cook for 10 minutes. Season to taste.
Serve with a good shaving of parmesan and crusty bread.

PHOTO: STEPH PEIRCE

PHOTO: STEPH PEIRCE

Curried lentil, pumpkin and coconut soup

  • 2 tbsp coconut oil
  • 1 medium onion, peeled and diced
  • 4 large cloves garlic, crushed
  • 2 tsp sea salt
  • 1 tbsp fresh ginger, finely grated
  • 2 tsp yellow mustard seeds
  • 2 tsp ground turmeric
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp curry powder
  • ¼ tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 litre vegetable or chicken stock
  • 1 can coconut cream
  • ½ cup dried brown lentils
  • ½ cup dried red lentils
  • 300g pumpkin, skin removed and grated
  • 1 tbsp honey or maple syrup
  • ½ lemon, juice only
  • 2 handfuls baby spinach or silverbeet leaves, roughly chopped
  • Coconut yoghurt or greek yoghurt, to serve

Method
In a large pot on medium heat, combine the oil, onion, garlic and 1 teaspoon salt. When you hear a sizzle, cover the pot, turn heat to low and cook, stirring every so often, until the onion has softened and is just beginning to colour, 6-8 minutes.
Stir in the grated ginger, mustard seeds, turmeric, ground cumin, curry powder and black pepper. Cook, stirring often, until fragrant, about 1 minute.
Add the stock, coconut cream, both lentils and remaining 1 teaspoon salt, then bring to a boil. Reduce to low, cover and simmer for 20 minutes before adding the grated pumpkin, giving the soup a good stir and cooking for a further 20-30 minutes until the lentils are tender and starting to break down.
Stir in the spinach, honey or maple and lemon juice and return to a simmer. Taste and season with salt if desired. Serve immediately with a good dollop of coconut or Greek-style yoghurt.

More recipes from Steph

Harissa, meatball and cannellini bean soup

  • ½ onion
  • ½ leek
  • 1 celery stick
  • 2 small carrots
  • 6 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 4 tbsp Local&Friday harissa paste
  • 1 can chopped tomatoes
  • 1.5 litres chicken or vegetable stock
  • 1 Tbsp maple syrup or brown sugar
  • Juice of half a lemon
  • 1 can cannellini beans, rinsed and drained
  • 60g spinach or silverbeet, roughly chopped
  • Salt and pepper to taste

    Meatballs
  • 300g beef mince
  • ½ onion, grated
  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 1 egg
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • ¼ tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • ¼ cup grated parmesan
  • ½ tsp oregano
  • 1 tsp smoked paprika

Method
Using a heavy-bottomed, ovenproof dish or pot, heat oil over medium heat. Add onion, leek, celery, carrot and 1 tsp salt and cook for 10 min, stirring frequently until vegetables soften slightly. Add garlic and harissa paste, then cook for 2 minutes until aromatic. Add tomatoes and chicken stock, cover and simmer for 25 minutes.
Meanwhile, for the meatballs, combine all ingredients in a medium-sized bowl and mix together with your hands until well combined. Using a teaspoon, spoon out heaped teaspoons of mixture and roll into small balls. Place in the fridge.
Remove the lid from the soup, giving it a good stir, and add the spinach/silverbeet, maple syrup/brown sugar, lemon juice and cannellini beans. Cook for 2 minutes before gently placing the meatballs into the soup, making sure they are slightly covered by the liquid. Cover the pot and cook for 10 minutes. Season to taste.
Serve with a good shaving of parmesan and crusty bread.

PHOTO: STEPH PEIRCE

PHOTO: STEPH PEIRCE

Curried lentil, pumpkin and coconut soup

  • 2 tbsp coconut oil
  • 1 medium onion, peeled and diced
  • 4 large cloves garlic, crushed
  • 2 tsp sea salt
  • 1 tbsp fresh ginger, finely grated
  • 2 tsp yellow mustard seeds
  • 2 tsp ground turmeric
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp curry powder
  • ¼ tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 litre vegetable or chicken stock
  • 1 can coconut cream
  • ½ cup dried brown lentils
  • ½ cup dried red lentils
  • 300g pumpkin, skin removed and grated
  • 1 tbsp honey or maple syrup
  • ½ lemon, juice only
  • 2 handfuls baby spinach or silverbeet leaves, roughly chopped
  • Coconut yoghurt or greek yoghurt, to serve

Method
In a large pot on medium heat, combine the oil, onion, garlic and 1 teaspoon salt. When you hear a sizzle, cover the pot, turn heat to low and cook, stirring every so often, until the onion has softened and is just beginning to colour, 6-8 minutes.
Stir in the grated ginger, mustard seeds, turmeric, ground cumin, curry powder and black pepper. Cook, stirring often, until fragrant, about 1 minute.
Add the stock, coconut cream, both lentils and remaining 1 teaspoon salt, then bring to a boil. Reduce to low, cover and simmer for 20 minutes before adding the grated pumpkin, giving the soup a good stir and cooking for a further 20-30 minutes until the lentils are tender and starting to break down.
Stir in the spinach, honey or maple and lemon juice and return to a simmer. Taste and season with salt if desired. Serve immediately with a good dollop of coconut or Greek-style yoghurt.

More recipes from Steph

PHOTO: STEPH PEIRCE

PHOTO: STEPH PEIRCE

The magic of BREAD

BREADSONG is the story about how a 14-year-old girl named Kitty and her father Al opened a bakery.
Kitty Tait had begun to experience anxiety. She struggled to wake up, get dressed and leave the house, so her parents tried everything to help, including introducing new hobbies and visiting specialists. Nothing seemed to help.
Until, one day watching Al mix flour, water and salt into a bread dough she determined the gloopy mix looked like her brain. The next day when she looked at the bubbling mix she realised the bread was alive.
Al, who worked at Oxford University, asked Kitty if she would like to try baking the bread herself and their lives were never the same again. One loaf quickly escalated into an obsession and Kitty felt better than she had in a long time.
Nine months later they opened The Orange Bakery in their home town of Watlington in Oxford, England, and have not stopped since. Al has realised he is no longer a teacher, but a baker.
‘‘I had no idea where we were going when Kitty started to bake bread, but I knew that I had to be alongside her because it was the only thing that made any sense.’’
The book is named after Kitty’s first Instagram post, ‘‘Breadsong’’, a short film of a row of loaves crackling and hissing as their crusts expand after they have just come out of the oven.

If you lean in closely to loaves on the cooling rack — being careful not to singe your ear — it can sound like distant applause. That’s the magic of bread.

They each tell the story of their journey in the first section of the book before they share some of their favourite recipes from the bakery — a difficult task when virtually everything Kitty does is from memory and instinct. So they had to pin down quantities and techniques and write the recipes.
‘‘We wanted our recipes to really unpick some of the fear around different doughs and pastries.’’
Kitty’s favourite sourdough is among the recipes, which include doughnuts, sweet and savoury pastries and loafs and buns of all shapes and sizes.

PHOTOS: MARK LORD PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOS: MARK LORD PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOS: MARK LORD PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOS: MARK LORD PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOS: MARK LORD PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOS: MARK LORD PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOS: MARK LORD PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOS: MARK LORD PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOS: MARK LORD PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOS: MARK LORD PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOS: MARK LORD PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOS: MARK LORD PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOS: MARK LORD PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOS: MARK LORD PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOS: MARK LORD PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOS: MARK LORD PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOS: MARK LORD PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOS: MARK LORD PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOS: MARK LORD PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOS: MARK LORD PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOS: MARK LORD PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOS: MARK LORD PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOS: MARK LORD PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOS: MARK LORD PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOS: MARK LORD PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOS: MARK LORD PHOTOGRAPHY

BREADSONG is the story about how a 14-year-old girl named Kitty and her father Al opened a bakery.
Kitty Tait had begun to experience anxiety. She struggled to wake up, get dressed and leave the house, so her parents tried everything to help, including introducing new hobbies and visiting specialists. Nothing seemed to help.
Until, one day watching Al mix flour, water and salt into a bread dough she determined the gloopy mix looked like her brain. The next day when she looked at the bubbling mix she realised the bread was alive.
Al, who worked at Oxford University, asked Kitty if she would like to try baking the bread herself and their lives were never the same again. One loaf quickly escalated into an obsession and Kitty felt better than she had in a long time.

PHOTOS: MARK LORD PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOS: MARK LORD PHOTOGRAPHY

Nine months later they opened The Orange Bakery in their home town of Watlington in Oxford, England, and have not stopped since. Al has realised he is no longer a teacher, but a baker.
‘‘I had no idea where we were going when Kitty started to bake bread, but I knew that I had to be alongside her because it was the only thing that made any sense.’’
The book is named after Kitty’s first Instagram post, ‘‘Breadsong’’, a short film of a row of loaves crackling and hissing as their crusts expand after they have just come out of the oven.

If you lean in closely to loaves on the cooling rack — being careful not to singe your ear — it can sound like distant applause. That’s the magic of bread.

They each tell the story of their journey in the first section of the book before they share some of their favourite recipes from the bakery — a difficult task when virtually everything Kitty does is from memory and instinct. So they had to pin down quantities and techniques and write the recipes.
‘‘We wanted our recipes to really unpick some of the fear around different doughs and pastries.’’
Kitty’s favourite sourdough is among the recipes, which include doughnuts, sweet and savoury pastries and loafs and buns of all shapes and sizes.

Everything dough

We use this dough for pretty much everything, hence the name. It’s more enriched with butter, eggs and sugar than the dough used for the fika buns, which gives it the feel of a brioche. For the savoury recipes made with this dough like the End-of-the-Week Tear-and-Share — just cut back the sugar to 10g.

  • 200ml lukewarm whole milk
  • 7g instant dried yeast (2 teaspoons or a whole sachet)
  • 500g strong white bread flour or plain flour
  • 80g caster sugar for a sweet dough or 10g caster sugar for a savoury dough
  • 10g fine sea salt
  • 2 eggs
  • 125g soft unsalted butter, cubed

Method
Gently warm the milk in a small saucepan. Remove the pan from the heat and whisk in the yeast. Set aside and leave to bubble for 5 minutes.
In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour, sugar and salt. Make a small well in the flour, pour in the milk and yeast mixture, crack in the eggs and stir together until it forms a rough dough.
Tip the dough on to a lightly floured work surface and either knead by hand for 10 minutes or in a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook for 4-5 minutes, gradually working the cubes of butter into the dough as you knead until it is soft, silky and stretchy. Pop the dough back into the bowl, place a damp tea towel or shower cap over the rim and leave to prove for 1 hour until the dough has almost doubled in size. Alternatively, refrigerate the dough (still covered) overnight, ready to bake the next day. If you can plan for this extra proving time, it really helps as the dough is much easier to work with when cold.

Everything dough

We use this dough for pretty much everything, hence the name. It’s more enriched with butter, eggs and sugar than the dough used for the fika buns, which gives it the feel of a brioche. For the savoury recipes made with this dough like the End-of-the-Week Tear-and-Share — just cut back the sugar to 10g.

  • 200ml lukewarm whole milk
  • 7g instant dried yeast (2 teaspoons or a whole sachet)
  • 500g strong white bread flour or plain flour
  • 80g caster sugar for a sweet dough or 10g caster sugar for a savoury dough
  • 10g fine sea salt
  • 2 eggs
  • 125g soft unsalted butter, cubed

Method
Gently warm the milk in a small saucepan. Remove the pan from the heat and whisk in the yeast. Set aside and leave to bubble for 5 minutes.
In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour, sugar and salt. Make a small well in the flour, pour in the milk and yeast mixture, crack in the eggs and stir together until it forms a rough dough.
Tip the dough on to a lightly floured work surface and either knead by hand for 10 minutes or in a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook for 4-5 minutes, gradually working the cubes of butter into the dough as you knead until it is soft, silky and stretchy. Pop the dough back into the bowl, place a damp tea towel or shower cap over the rim and leave to prove for 1 hour until the dough has almost doubled in size. Alternatively, refrigerate the dough (still covered) overnight, ready to bake the next day. If you can plan for this extra proving time, it really helps as the dough is much easier to work with when cold.

End-of-the-week tear-and-share

This is a great way of using up what is left in the fridge. Shape your buns into rounds and place them quite close to each other on a baking tray and that way they’ll quietly fuse during proving, making the tear-and-share bit work.

  • 1 quantity of Everything Dough (but made using 10g of sugar because this is a savoury dish)
  • Whatever you have in your fridge or store cupboard (see below for flavour suggestions)
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten, for the egg wash
  • sesame or poppy seeds, for sprinkling (optional)

Method
Tip the dough on to a lightly floured work surface. Using a sharp knife, cut the dough into 12 equal wedges.
Flatten each wedge down and place your chosen fillings in the centre. Seal in your fillings by folding up the sides of the dough and pinching them together.
Line a deep baking tray with parchment paper. Place the buns seam side down on the tray, spacing them 1cm apart. Brush with the egg wash and sprinkle with sesame seeds, poppy seeds or leave naked. Drape a damp tea towel over the top of the tray and leave in a warm place to prove for 40-45 minutes, or until doubled in size.
Preheat the oven to 200degC/180degC fan.
Bake in the hot oven for 20-25 minutes or until golden. Leave to cool for 5 minutes then eat while still hot.

Fillings
These are some of the things that we’ve tried and work really well:

  • Leftover black bean chilli and coriander
  • Pesto, chorizo and crispy potatoes
  • Cheese, olives and crispy fried onions (we love the ones you can buy in packets from Middle Eastern supermarkets)

Fika buns

IF we all ate fika, I think the world would be a much better place. Fika is a Scandinavian ritual, like afternoon tea. Traditionally, a range of buns are served that you share with your neighbours, people you work with or friends (imaginary or otherwise). It’s such a great custom and even the mighty Volvo plant in Sweden stops for fika every day. What follows here are the recipes for three different flavoured buns, all made from the same dough but with different fillings (butters) and glazes. We recommend the Milky Way glaze with the cinnamon bun, the coffee glaze with the cardamom and orange bun and the orange glaze with the Nutella bun, but it’s totally up to you. We’ve given quantities for the butter and glaze recipes, but to be honest, you can adjust them depending on whether you want a subtle hint of flavour or a big mouthful, so don’t feel tied down to the measurements.

For the dough

  • 200ml warm whole milk (as warm as a relaxing bath)
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 7g instant dried yeast (2 teaspoons or a whole sachet)
  • 500g strong white bread flour or plain flour
  • 10g fine sea salt
  • 30g caster sugar
  • 1 tablespoon ground cardamom (optional, if making buns with cinnamon butter filling)
  • 125g soft unsalted butter, cubed
  • zest of 1 orange (if making buns with Nutella butter filling)

Method
In a small bowl, whisk together the milk, egg and yeast. In a separate large mixing bowl, combine the flour, salt, sugar and ground cardamom, if using. (The ground cardamom is optional for the cinnamon butter buns, but it gives them a subtle Scandi flavour.) Make a small well in the flour, pour in the milk mixture and stir together until it forms a rough dough.
Tip the dough on to a lightly floured work surface and either knead by hand for 8-10 minutes or in a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook for 4-5 minutes, gradually working the cubes of butter into the dough as you knead until it is smooth and glossy. Pop the dough back into the bowl, place a damp tea towel or shower cap over the rim and leave to prove for 1-1½ hours until the dough has almost doubled in size. Alternatively, refrigerate the dough (still covered) for anywhere between 4 hours and overnight. It will still prove, just more slowly, and the dough will be much easier to handle.
Tip your puffy dough on to a lightly floured work surface and roll it out into a 30cm x 20cm rectangle that is roughly 5mm thick. Transfer the dough to a baking tray and put it in the fridge for 10 minutes or so. (Chilling firms up the dough, which makes it easier to spread over the butter filling during the next stage.) Meanwhile, prepare your chosen butter filling.
Once the dough is chilled and the butter filling is ready, lay the dough rectangle on the work surface with a longer side facing you. Spread your butter filling across the first two-thirds of the dough, fold the naked one-third towards you into the middle over the top of the buttered third and then fold the buttered third nearest to you over the folded layers. You now have a long triple-decker sandwich of layers of dough and butter filling, which will give your buns their signature lamination.
Again, roll out the dough into a 30cm x 20cm rectangle with a longer side facing you. Using a sharp knife or pizza cutter, slice the dough into 15 equal strips, each roughly 2cm wide, so that your dough looks like a picket fence.
Take one strip of dough and coil it up from one end so that it looks like a snail’s shell. Stretch the last 2cm of the strip, wrap it over the top of the coil and then tuck it underneath — your snail now looks like it is checking its undercarriage. Repeat for all the dough strips. Place the coiled buns on two baking trays lined with parchment paper, spacing them a few centimetres apart. Cover with a damp tea towel and leave somewhere warm to prove for 30 minutes.
Preheat the oven to 180degC/160degC fan.
Bake in the hot oven for 15-20 minutes or until golden brown. Leave on a wire rack to cool for 15 minutes, then brush with your chosen glaze.

End-of-the-week tear-and-share

This is a great way of using up what is left in the fridge. Shape your buns into rounds and place them quite close to each other on a baking tray and that way they’ll quietly fuse during proving, making the tear-and-share bit work.

  • 1 quantity of Everything Dough (but made using 10g of sugar because this is a savoury dish)
  • Whatever you have in your fridge or store cupboard (see below for flavour suggestions)
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten, for the egg wash
  • sesame or poppy seeds, for sprinkling (optional)

Method
Tip the dough on to a lightly floured work surface. Using a sharp knife, cut the dough into 12 equal wedges.
Flatten each wedge down and place your chosen fillings in the centre. Seal in your fillings by folding up the sides of the dough and pinching them together.
Line a deep baking tray with parchment paper. Place the buns seam side down on the tray, spacing them 1cm apart. Brush with the egg wash and sprinkle with sesame seeds, poppy seeds or leave naked. Drape a damp tea towel over the top of the tray and leave in a warm place to prove for 40-45 minutes, or until doubled in size.
Preheat the oven to 200degC/180degC fan.
Bake in the hot oven for 20-25 minutes or until golden. Leave to cool for 5 minutes then eat while still hot.

Fillings
These are some of the things that we’ve tried and work really well:

  • Leftover black bean chilli and coriander
  • Pesto, chorizo and crispy potatoes
  • Cheese, olives and crispy fried onions (we love the ones you can buy in packets from Middle Eastern supermarkets)

Fika buns

IF we all ate fika, I think the world would be a much better place. Fika is a Scandinavian ritual, like afternoon tea. Traditionally, a range of buns are served that you share with your neighbours, people you work with or friends (imaginary or otherwise). It’s such a great custom and even the mighty Volvo plant in Sweden stops for fika every day. What follows here are the recipes for three different flavoured buns, all made from the same dough but with different fillings (butters) and glazes. We recommend the Milky Way glaze with the cinnamon bun, the coffee glaze with the cardamom and orange bun and the orange glaze with the Nutella bun, but it’s totally up to you. We’ve given quantities for the butter and glaze recipes, but to be honest, you can adjust them depending on whether you want a subtle hint of flavour or a big mouthful, so don’t feel tied down to the measurements.

For the dough

  • 200ml warm whole milk (as warm as a relaxing bath)
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 7g instant dried yeast (2 teaspoons or a whole sachet)
  • 500g strong white bread flour or plain flour
  • 10g fine sea salt
  • 30g caster sugar
  • 1 tablespoon ground cardamom (optional, if making buns with cinnamon butter filling)
  • 125g soft unsalted butter, cubed
  • zest of 1 orange (if making buns with Nutella butter filling)

Method
In a small bowl, whisk together the milk, egg and yeast. In a separate large mixing bowl, combine the flour, salt, sugar and ground cardamom, if using. (The ground cardamom is optional for the cinnamon butter buns, but it gives them a subtle Scandi flavour.) Make a small well in the flour, pour in the milk mixture and stir together until it forms a rough dough.
Tip the dough on to a lightly floured work surface and either knead by hand for 8-10 minutes or in a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook for 4-5 minutes, gradually working the cubes of butter into the dough as you knead until it is smooth and glossy. Pop the dough back into the bowl, place a damp tea towel or shower cap over the rim and leave to prove for 1-1½ hours until the dough has almost doubled in size. Alternatively, refrigerate the dough (still covered) for anywhere between 4 hours and overnight. It will still prove, just more slowly, and the dough will be much easier to handle.
Tip your puffy dough on to a lightly floured work surface and roll it out into a 30cm x 20cm rectangle that is roughly 5mm thick. Transfer the dough to a baking tray and put it in the fridge for 10 minutes or so. (Chilling firms up the dough, which makes it easier to spread over the butter filling during the next stage.) Meanwhile, prepare your chosen butter filling.
Once the dough is chilled and the butter filling is ready, lay the dough rectangle on the work surface with a longer side facing you. Spread your butter filling across the first two-thirds of the dough, fold the naked one-third towards you into the middle over the top of the buttered third and then fold the buttered third nearest to you over the folded layers. You now have a long triple-decker sandwich of layers of dough and butter filling, which will give your buns their signature lamination.
Again, roll out the dough into a 30cm x 20cm rectangle with a longer side facing you. Using a sharp knife or pizza cutter, slice the dough into 15 equal strips, each roughly 2cm wide, so that your dough looks like a picket fence.
Take one strip of dough and coil it up from one end so that it looks like a snail’s shell. Stretch the last 2cm of the strip, wrap it over the top of the coil and then tuck it underneath — your snail now looks like it is checking its undercarriage. Repeat for all the dough strips. Place the coiled buns on two baking trays lined with parchment paper, spacing them a few centimetres apart. Cover with a damp tea towel and leave somewhere warm to prove for 30 minutes.
Preheat the oven to 180degC/160degC fan.
Bake in the hot oven for 15-20 minutes or until golden brown. Leave on a wire rack to cool for 15 minutes, then brush with your chosen glaze.

Butters & glazes

Cinnamon butter

  • 100g soft unsalted butter
  • 100g caster sugar
  • 1 heaped Tbsp ground cinnamon

Method
Combine all the ingredients in a mixing bowl and beat with a wooden spoon until fully combined into a smooth paste.

Cardamom and orange butter

  • 100g soft unsalted butter
  • 100g soft light brown sugar
  • 1 heaped Tbsp ground cardamom
  • zest of 1 orange

Method
Combine all the ingredients in a mixing bowl and beat with a wooden spoon until fully combined into a smooth paste.

Coffee glaze

  • 100ml black coffee (espresso or filter)
  • 50g soft light brown sugar

Method
Warm the coffee in a small saucepan over medium heat, add the sugar and stir until it has all dissolved.
Brush or spoon the warm glaze over the cooled buns and leave to set.

Milky way glaze

  • 100ml whole milk
  • 50g caster sugar

Method
Warm the milk in a small saucepan over medium heat, add the sugar and stir until it has all dissolved.
Brush or spoon the warm glaze over the cooled buns and leave to set. The glaze adds a thin icing but also soaks through into the dough, adding another layer of flavour.

Nutella butter

  • Half of a 350g jar of Nutella
  • 1 Tbsp tahini, or to taste

Method
This is the easiest of all — no mixing, no measuring, just use a jar of Nutella for the butter filling (this is plenty but I promise you’ll end up adding a bit more, which is why you just need the jar on standby). If you’re feeling adventurous, you can add some tahini — this adds a really nice extra nuttiness. Simply dribble the tahini over the top of the Nutella when spreading it over the dough.

Orange glaze

  • 100ml orange juice
  • 1 heaped Tbsp orange marmalade (thin-cut is best)
  • 1 Tbsp roughly chopped hazelnuts (optional)

Method
Warm the orange juice in a small saucepan over medium heat, add the marmalade and stir together until you're left with a mouth-watering syrup.
Brush or spoon the warm glaze over the cooled buns. Scatter over a few chopped hazelnuts, if you want.